The latest issue of the Police Union Magazine is out.

Yet again – they lie to their members and attack shooters.

We still marvel at anyone saying: “Its not a gun register – its just a list of guns along with the people who own them” with a straight face.

Have a Look

They delight in the idea of dawn raids on lawful shooters. The idea that the most vetted group in the nation could have less rights than criminals.

Illegal firearms warnings continue

As the Police Association welcomes new recommendations designed to control illegal firearms in New Zealand, the number of reports of such weapons encountered by our members continue unabated.

In the first four months of this year, the Association received information from members of more than 125 incidents in which firearms were reported or located during routine policing, sometimes being pointed at officers.

Last year, there were more than 400 such notifications from members. The reports, which are voluntary and not official records, are nonetheless good indicators of the prevalence of firearms, especially among criminals and amount to an average of one incident every day.

(KGB: Be aware that an ‘Incident’ can be finding a broken airgun or a single bullet under a car seat)

The weapons encountered, either in vehicles or properties, include hand guns, sawn-off shotguns, pump-action shotguns, semi-automatics weapons, modified highpowered air pistols, rifles, and starter pistols modified to fire .22 rounds, along with ammunition.

Members also report on burglaries in which gun safes have been broken into and firearms stolen. The weapons are being used in carjackings and aggravated robberies, as well as going hand in hand with methamphetamine dealing and inter-gang conflict.

Just last month, Police received multiple emergency calls after a gang altercation in Rotorua in which shots were fired near a children’s playground and a Saturday morning market.

Police Association President Chris Cahill has said that the recommendations released in April by the Law and Order Select Committee have addressed many of the concerns raised by the Association, which made submissions to the committee.

“The proposed reforms concentrate on keeping firearms out of the hands of criminals,” he said. “While this may impose increased obligations on responsible gun owners, these are not onerous and represent a fair compromise between the privilege of gun ownership and the responsibilities this brings.”

The Association was particularly pleased with the recommendation that a permit to procure a firearm would be extended to cover the sale or transfer of all firearms. That process would provide details of firearms transactions to Police and help build a database of firearms possession.

The Association was also pleased with the recommendation that gang members not be allowed to own firearms. The committee decided against a firearms register, opting instead for Police to record serial numbers, and the Association was happy with that, particularly combined with a recommendation to extend Police powers to enter a property to inspect the security of “A” category firearms.

However, Mr Cahill said, there appeared to be a “glaring omission” over tightening up on the tens of thousands of firearms imported into New Zealand each year. “We have to ask why on earth we need all these firearms, why we need MSSAs and non-sports handguns, and why is it acceptable to not know where many of these weapons end up?”

The committee made 20 recommendations in the following areas: sale and supply of firearms and ammunition; definition of military-style semi-automatics; effectiveness of licensing, training and registering firearms; criminal offending with firearms; reducing the number of “grey” firearms (those held by unlicensed people, but not for criminal purposes); importing firearms into New Zealand.

To read the full report visit, parliament.nz (search Addressing how criminals get guns).

Important!

Now look at what was printed right beside the nonsense above:

The 2017 Police Association Member Survey is your chance to have a say on the issues that matter. This month (May), the Association will be surveying members on the issues that affect police in 2017.

The survey will be run by Nielsen research company, ensuring independence and confidentiality. Surveys are one of the ways the Association stays in touch with members’ views and help us represent you better.

Professional surveys are particularly useful as they provide evidence to back up our position when talking to Police management, the Government and the media. Previous surveys have helped the Association ensure it is developing the right policies and advocating on the issues that matter most to members, including training, staff resources, firearms, Tasers, restructuring and budget cuts.

You will notice that many of the questions are similar to those in the 2015 survey; this is so we can see if views on certain issues have changed over time. Survey details will be emailed to you with a link to a website where the survey can be completed confidentially.

We know time is precious, so the questionnaire has been structured so it can be completed in about 15 minutes. We would be grateful if you were able, perhaps during a break or before you go home for the day, to tell us what you think about the issues affecting you.

Notice that ‘Firearms’ are mentioned specifically?

That is why Cahill has been going so hard misleading his members.

Soon he may be able to claim their support for his idiocy.

Here is an accompanying press release:

POLICE ASSOCIATION WELCOMES NEW FOCUS ON ILLEGAL FIREARMS IN NEW ZEALAND

NZPA | Fri April 7th, 2017

The New Zealand Police Association says Parliament’s Law and Order Select Committee is clearly serious about dealing with the illegal possession of firearms in New Zealand.

Association President Chris Cahill says today’s report, following ten months of submissions and deliberations, has produced some good, common sense recommendations which answer a number of concerns the Association has with the current situation.

“We are particularly pleased with the recommendation that the permit to procure a firearm be extended to cover the sale or transfer of all firearms,” Mr Cahill said.

The Committee noted that this process would provide details of firearms transactions to the Police, and over time, this information would build a database of firearms possessed by individuals. 

“The Committee members have recognised that this permit regime would initially impose an administrative burden on buyers, sellers and the Police, but it is time to focus on the bigger picture.  New Zealand needs to better monitor private sales of firearms and the majority of the country’s 242,000 licensed owners will agree with that.  An online process for permits will eventually reduce the costs to all,” Mr Cahill said.

The Association applauds the tough stance recommended with respect to gangs.

“Anything that makes being a member of a gang less appealing, we’re happy with,” Mr Cahill said.

“Gang members and gang prospects are not fit and proper persons to possess firearms, and they demonstrate that every day of the week.  We know of gang members who are licensed firearms carriers and currently there is nothing to stop them purchasing any number of weapons, and then distributing them amongst the gang,” he said. 

The Committee decided against the creation of a firearms register, opting instead for a law change to require Police to record the serial numbers of firearms owned by licence holders when they renew their licences, or are subject to inspection of their premises.

“We are quite happy with that recommendation, particularly when it is combined with the recommendations to extend the powers of the Police to enter premises to inspect the security of “A” category firearms, and loss of licence as the penalty if storage regulations are not complied with.  This will mean when Police carry out security checks they can at the same time, record serial numbers and add them to the Police registry,” Mr Cahill said.

“These are only a number of the recommendations, and they sit amongst many others that the Association believes will lead to a much better understanding of where firearms are across the country.”

However the Association is not happy with the Committee’s attitude to the rules and regulations surrounding the importation of firearms.

“There appears to be a glaring omission in the report when it comes to tightening up on the tens of thousands of firearms imported into New Zealand every year.  We have to ask why on earth we need all these firearms, why we need MSSAs and pistols, and why is it acceptable to not know where many of these weapons end up,” Mr Cahill said.

The Association hopes the Government will take seriously  the recommendations, and implement them as soon as possible.

1479797620407

Once AGAIN Cahill is on about import restrictions.

But WHAT specifically does he want?

Why wont he answer this question?

As for: “New Zealand needs to better monitor private sales of firearms and the majority of the country’s 242,000 licensed owners will agree with that”.  

We seem to have missed that survey.

f3

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